7.000 digitized maps of Dutch Indies georeferenced by the public

20161117_163356The successful georeferencing project Maps in the Crowd – Dutch Indies closed on November 17th with a festive event. Over the last seven months a grand total of 7.000 digitized maps of the Dutch Indies has been georeferenced by the general public. These maps belong to the Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies (KITLV). Since July 2014 this heritage collection is part of the Leiden University Libraries.

A large crowd gathered at the University Library to attend our public event celebrating the completion of the georeferencing process. It was with great pleasure that we handed out prizes to our most active volunteers and got to thank them personally for all their hard work!

The meeting kicked off with a general overview of the project by project leaders Martijn Storms and 20161117_155447Patrick Gouw. After the key-note lecture by dr. Frank Okker (who spoke about ‘super-volunteer’ Gerret Rouffaer, Indonesia explorer and ‘founder’ of the KITLV map collection) there was a lively panel discussion, in which our overall winner Carl Mierop and Heleen Hayes told us more about their experiences with using the Georeferencer. Questions were asked from the audience and a lot of feedback was received that will be taken into account for the next project phases.

During the award ceremony it was great to see many of our 20161117_163648top contributors, the driving people behind the project, together on stage. Carl Mierop was rewarded with a special gift: the monumental and rare full-colour Atlas of the Netherlands East Indies whilst the runners-up received a reproduction of a KITLV-map of their choice. Before a round of drinks and bites concluded the afternoon curator Martijn Storms showed the attendees several of the original maps that were included in our project.

 

 

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Loan agreement South Asia Collection

5The UBL and the Friends of the Kern Institute (VVIK) signed a loan agreement for the collection of South Asia, especially India, and Tibet. The collection contains material from before 1960, which was purchas
ed or donated to the VVIK before or after 1960. The collection includes rare books, recent books and journals, archives from the collection VVIK, Sanskrit, Tibetan and other manuscripts, Tibetan block prints and Abklatschen, a photo collection and a collection of glass plates. The Kern collection is renowned worldwide.

Relocation of the KITLV collections

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The relocation of the collections of the Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies (KITLV), from the Reuvensplaats to the closed stacks at the University Library is in full swing.  This will last until February 1st. In total, 12 kilometers of collections will be moved.

During the relocation supply of requested materials may be delayed, but we aim to supply once an hour. The stacks at the Reuvensplaats still contain some personal collections of researchers (archives, materials, documentation files etc.).

The KITLV reference library at the University Library has been moved from the open stacks on floor -1 to the Noordhal’s ground floor. This measure was taken to create space for the East Asian Library collections that are being brought in from the Arsenaal. The KITLV reference library will also be shelved according to the Library of Congress Classification. On March 1st 2017 the collections will be relocated to the Asian Library, along with the reference collections for China, Japan and South and Central Asia.

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Leiden Asia Year 2017

LAY_logo_1130x300pxThroughout 2017 Leiden will be the leading centre for Asia in terms of research, teaching, collections and expertise. The Leiden Asia Year was prompted by the building of The Asian Library on the roof of the University Library, which will be opened in September 2017. Leiden University, the municipality of Leiden and cultural partners are all committed to making this year a success.

Read more about the Leiden Asia Year initiative and the launch of the new website www.leidenasiayear.nl during the opening of Leiden University’s academic year on 5 September 2016.

Relocation and availability of the EAL collections

IMG_9716At this moment we are finalizing the relocation of the collections from the stacks of the East Asian Library (EAL) into the closed stacks of the University Library. A few exceptions aside, such as the reference collection, microfilms, and redundant collections, the complete EAL collections will be moved into the closed stacks of the University Library by the end of August. Between September 2016 and February 2017 a part of the collection (2.500 m) will be reshelved into the open stacks on the minus 1 level of the University Library. The collection will be placed according to the Library of Congress Classification. The reference collection will ultimately be housed in the newly-constructed Asian Library in April 2017.

IMG_9636We will make sure all of the collections will remain available during these operations. After the move of the EAL collections into the University Library, the materials can easily be requested and delivered to the Arsenaal, the University Library, or any other library location. In the University Library the requested materials will be available within one hour and can be collected from the book lockers. Delivery to other library locations will be once a day. Due to the ongoing reshelving of the collections, there may be some delay in delivery times.

At the Arsenaal the study area -including the reference collection, teacher shelves, and information desk- will remain available until the Asian Library opens in April 2017. The reference collection will be moved as soon as the new Asian Library is ready for use. The subject librarians will remain in their offices at the Arsenaal until that date as well.

Leiden University Libraries donates more than 3000 images to Wikimedia

Leiden University Libraries (UBL) has donated over 3000 historic photographs and prints 89895on the Dutch East Indies, China, Japan, Singapore and Suriname to Wikimedia Commons, the image database of Wikipedia. The images are part the Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies (KITLV) collection, which is conserved by the UBL. The upload of the images was done by Wikipedian Hans Muller.

Extensive collection
Besides images from the Dutch East Indies, the donation also includes pictures from China, Japan, Singapore and Suriname. Material such as watercolors depicting various Surinamese populations created by Father Borret, photos of nineteenth century Japan by pioneer photographer Felice Beato and photographs made by the famous photographic studio Lambert & Co. in Singapore.

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The pictures were already available through the UBL and KITLV, but with the donation to Wikimedia the historical material is now also online in the public domain. This means that everyone is allowed to use the pictures for free. The user can also improve the descriptions and make additions. One year ago, 2400 Asian historical photographs were added by UBL to Wikimedia.

Consult Wikimedia
The donated images are available through Wikimedia Commons. The search can be done in Dutch as well English. It’s also possible to search on KITLV, preferably followed by a geographical location, name of photographer or subject.

 

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